University of Pittsburgh

Faculty News

Wednesday, June 22, 2011 - 1:31pm

Professor John Burkoff commented on the court's exclusion of a statement made by the defendant's mother, in which she told police that her son killed police officers.  Professor Burkoff said that the judge probably kept the statement out of the trial because it seems conclusive on exactly the issue that the jury must decide: whether or not Poplawski killed the three officers.

 

Link

Wednesday, June 22, 2011 - 1:26pm

Professor of Legal Writing Ben Bratman has published "Legal Research and Writing as a Proxy: Using Traditional Assignments to Achieve a More Fundamental Form of Practice Readiness," in the Spring 2011 edition of The Second Draft, the newsletter of the Legal Writing Institute.  From the article:

 

Regardless of what precisely beginning lawyers are writing or doing, there remains much to be said for requiring first-year students to complete the traditional troika of a formal inter-office memorandum, an appellate brief, and an appellate oral argument. . .[M]ost practicing lawyers will not perform all of these tasks during their careers, and many practicing lawyers will not perform any of them. Yet, each of these assignments retains considerable importance as an effective tool for instilling fundamental attributes of a good lawyer that go well beyond the basics of analysis and writing, and that ultimately can make a graduate more marketable and employable.

 

Link 

Tuesday, June 21, 2011 - 8:54am

Professor Jessie Allen discussed the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in the Wal-Mart case, in which more than a million female employees sued the company for sex discrimination.  The Supreme Court ruled that these women could not proceed through a class action lawsuit.  In the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, Professor Allen explained that the Wal-Mart decision was the latest of a string of cases that has made it harder to sue for employment discrimination.  "[These cases] are gate-keeping decisions about the procedural rules that govern what it takes to get any case into federal court, but together, they tend to keep job discrimination plaintiffs out of the courthouse," she explained.

 

Link to story

Monday, June 20, 2011 - 10:22am

On June 15, 2011, Professor Ronald Brand participated in the Study Group on implementation of the Hague Choice of Court Convention of the Secretary of State’s Advisory Committee on Private International Law, in Washington, D.C.  The Study Group is used by the Assistant Legal Adviser for Private International Law to review and give advice on current proposals.  Its current focus is on the coordination of state and federal law in the implementation of the Hague Convention. The Study Group meeting was led by Assistant Legal Adviser Keith Loken, and the Legal Adviser, Harold Koh, was present to address the group and engage in discussion.

Monday, June 20, 2011 - 10:03am

Professor Nancy Burkoff gave a presentation to an international audience of lawyers and law students on Comparative Civil and Common Law Analysis at the Twenty-First Century Legal Skills Conference in Istanbul, Turkey.  The conference was co-sponsored by the Legal Writing Institute and Bahcesehir University.  Professor Burkoff also participated in a panel discussion on Rule of Law, and in a press conference.

 

Monday, June 20, 2011 - 9:51am

Professor Jules Lobel told the Washington Post that President Obama needs Congressional approval under the War Powers Act for the U.S. military's involvement in the hostilities in Libya.  Professor Lobel asserted that the Administration's position -- that it needs no approval because it is only engaged in supporting NATO's actions -- is not correct.  “They are involved in a war, and the fact that they are in a support role, that I don’t think is dispositive in the War Powers Resolution debate,” he said.

 

Link to Washington Post article

Friday, June 17, 2011 - 9:49am

Jules Lobel discusses whether or not the Constitution requires the president to obtain the express consent of Congress to commit troops to war.

 

Read the full article here.

Friday, June 17, 2011 - 9:22am

Associate Dean of Research, David Harris, worked with city officials, legal experts, and community activists to craft a substantially more-detailed piece of legislation for police accountability.  

 

Read the full article here.

Thursday, June 16, 2011 - 10:59am

Professor David Harris discussed a civil suit over the invasion of the wrong home by FBI and task force agents.  The agents had an arrest warrant for a woman, but she had not lived at the residence in over a year.  Professor Harris told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review that proper execution of a warrant does not require that the police get everything right, but it does require that they make reasonable efforts to avoid obvious mistakes.  According to the complaint, the target of the search had moved out months before the family moved in, and was living in California.  Professor Harris said that "[i]f it was possible for [agents] to know that she was living out in California [by exercising] any reasonable degree of effort, that could matter."

 

Post-Gazette Story Link

Tribune Review Story Link

Wednesday, June 15, 2011 - 9:56am

On June 6-10, 2011, Professor Ronald Brand lectured on Transaction Planning Using Rules of Private International Law in the International Commercial Contracts Summer School in Ravenna, Italy.  The program was jointly sponsored by the University of Bologna, the Fondazione Flaminia Ravenna, the Port Authority of Ravenna, and Pitt Law’s Center for International Legal Education.

Syndicate content

Revised 09/28/2011 | Copyright 2011 | Site by UMC